Precious Keepsakes

March 31, 2015 8:46 PM | Sandy Jones

What makes something precious? 
 
In most cases it is its’ “rarity” – such as gems, art etc. The same is true with keepsakes. 

Some of my family keepsakes are very precious to me – because they are FEW. 
I have two photos of my great great grandfather. I  WISH I could have 4-5 photos, to give me a more complete glimpse into his life as a young child, confirmation, wedding, and then a family photo with his children, and one in old age.  That is all one really needs in regards to photos 50 years from now or more.  But most people have thousands…or thanks to digital cameras.. tens of thousands!

My grandmother also gave me his “mustache mug”. You couldn’t pay me to get rid of it. It is all I have. It has somehow survived 100 years and made it to me. When my family goes through my stuff someday… They will know that it is precious and that I cherished it by its care, or prominent placing, and because I have talked about it.  In the case of keepsakes - actions speak louder than words. To say an item is precious - only to find it stored in the attic for decades or covered in dust under a bed or closet, or otherwise neglected is insincere.  Peter Walsh says;  “If you value the item, you need to show it the honor it deserves. Otherwise it has no place in your home”.

I'd hope that my children will chose to keep these cherished items in the family, but I realize they might not. I've seen it many times. But all too often what I witness are family members that are overwhelmed by too many keepsakes and are tasked with too many decisions upon a family member passing, and either due to sheer volume or the fact that they can't tell the precious from the rest...they opt to let it ALL go! My goal; keep the best and treat my keepsakes like the rare gems that they are - out of honor, and in hopes that they will be cherished in the future versus an overwhelming burden.

Will your family be able to know what is precious to you?

  
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